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Rhode Island

The Rhode Island Food Policy Council's work is coordinated by a statewide collaboration of diverse, committed and engaged stakeholders from all sectors of the food system.  The Rhode Island Food Policy Council creates partnerships, develops policies and advocates for improvements to the local food system to increase and expand its capacity, viability and sustainability.

From the blog

6/30/16
Mobilizing Movement: Trailblazer decides to take action from inspiring directives at 2016 Summit Food Solutions New England hosted the 6 th in a series of Regional Food Summits in Bridgeport, CT on June 8–9, 2016. This two-day event featured more than 180 delegates from the six New England states working across the food system. Planners, farmers and farm workers, chefs, funders, government
3/3/16
The Rhode Island Food Policy Council (RIFPC) kicked off the New Year with an organizational retreat in January 2016 at the beautiful Save the Bay center. We welcomed six new members and planned for the year ahead. This year marks the third year of the Local Agriculture and Seafood Act (LASA) grants program, an innovative public-private partnership that provides needed and sought after funds to
11/2/15
Julius Kolawole has a plan to “bring the ocean to the desert.” Or at least the fish. The desert, in this case, is a “food desert,” places defined by the USDA as “urban neighborhoods and rural towns without ready access to fresh, healthy, and affordable food” which “have no food access or are served only by fast food restaurants and convenience stores that offer few healthy, affordable food
9/24/15
What do broken lightbulbs, listeria, and deli slicers have in common? Well, for one thing, they were all topics of discussion at the Food Safety for Product Development workshop, a two-night event featuring insightful instruction on how early stage food producers can take their products to the next level, and prevent some major food safety snafus before they occur. Held during the second week of
9/17/15
Newport, Rhode Island—mansions, yachts, fancy shops, and upscale restaurants and 70 percent of public school students living below poverty level. A surprising dichotomy, and one indicative of another problem facing more than 150,000 Rhode Islanders—food insecurity. In the U. S., more than 15 percent of people, almost 50 million, don’t know from where and when their next meal will come, and

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