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Policy & Advocacy

4/24/17
Permanent protection, dignity and respect for the 11 million undocumented people in the US! When do we want it? NOW!! On April 16 th , in the first of a two-part exploration of the connection between worker rights, racial justice, and sustainable food systems , the 21-day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge prompt referenced Cosecha (the name translates to “Harvest”), a nonviolent movement
4/17/17
“To build community requires vigilant awareness of the work we must continually do to undermine all the socialization that leads us to behave in ways that perpetuate domination.” - bell hooks Similar to other “helping professions” like teaching and social work, white women make up a large percentage of the nonprofit workforce. Those percentages drop precipitously for all women in executive
3/9/17
This post by Lesley Heiser was originally published by The Rumpus on March 6, 2017 as part of TORCH, their series devoted to showcasing personal essays and interviews about immigrant and refugee experiences. Featuring the work of diverse writers from around the globe, TORCH aims to shatter stereotypes and encourage greater understanding and empathy in a world where immigrant and refugee
3/2/17
This post was originally published in The Daily Hampshire Gazette, March 1, 2017, by Claire Morenon and Philip Korman and appeared in: CISA Opinion Pieces , Press Room As the national debate about refugees and immigration roils, we at Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA) have been reflecting on the history and the modern condition of farm labor in this country, and on our role as
2/17/17
In the spirit of the Summit, which was meant to be driven by and for all Rhode Islanders, we developed this post as a group, with multiple individuals contributing their voices and reflections. Rhode Island’s first Food System Summit, which was held on January 10, 2017, brought together participants from across the state food scene: farmers to composters, fishermen to researchers, state
2/2/17
This post originally appeared on Vermont Farm to Plate Features . When choosing to purchase food, cost is often a deciding factor for consumers. Why buy a 12-ounce package of local bacon for $7.99 when you can get it for $4.98? Purchasing local food means you know where your food comes from, you’re buying food that is generally healthier, and you’re helping drive the local economy to keep more
1/23/17
This post originally appeared on Ferment , the Real Pickles blog. The extraordinary political events taking place in our country are affecting us deeply here at Real Pickles Co-operative , as they are for so many others. They highlight how far we have to go to build the just, democratic, and sustainable society we wish to see. We are reminded why all of us here take Real Pickles’ social mission
11/17/16
With 60,000 tons of food wasted in the United States each year, at a cost of nearly $220 billion according to ReFED , wasted food is one of the great challenges facing our nation. Wasted food makes up 21% of all landfill volume, and as it decomposes, it releases methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more effective than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in Earth’s atmosphere. These consequences are all
11/3/16
By Elodie Reed, Concord Monitor staff Wednesday, November 2, 2016 Food is an undeniable key ingredient to political campaigns. It lent the setting (and sustenance) for Donald Trump’s January Red Arrow Diner stop in Manchester, where he now has a cheeseburger named after him. It gave a fun twist to Hillary Clinton’s 2015 swing by the Moo’s Place dairy bar in Derry, where she ordered a kiddie-sized
10/6/16
For those of us working to make the food system more just and sustainable, the idea that we might encounter a problem or two along the way is so obvious and banal that it doesn’t merit mention. Clearly there are barriers, chasms even, that stand in the way; otherwise we wouldn’t need to do this work. But the notion that we grapple with wicked problems brings in an entirely new dimension to our

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