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Race, Equity, & Social Justice

4/27/17
The exercise went like this: Pick a demographic profile. Then, jot down all the characteristics you associate with that profile. These are known as stereotypical characteristics. Then, think of someone you personally know who falls into that demographic profile and jot down his or her characteristics. Are they the same? Probably not, because the people we know personally are more interesting and
4/24/17
Permanent protection, dignity and respect for the 11 million undocumented people in the US! When do we want it? NOW!! On April 16 th , in the first of a two-part exploration of the connection between worker rights, racial justice, and sustainable food systems , the 21-day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge prompt referenced Cosecha (the name translates to “Harvest”), a nonviolent movement
4/17/17
“To build community requires vigilant awareness of the work we must continually do to undermine all the socialization that leads us to behave in ways that perpetuate domination.” - bell hooks Similar to other “helping professions” like teaching and social work, white women make up a large percentage of the nonprofit workforce. Those percentages drop precipitously for all women in executive
3/22/17
This post originally appeared on the Interaction Institute for Social Change blog . “It is certain, in any case, that ignorance, allied with power, is the most ferocious enemy justice can have.” James A. Baldwin For the third year in a row, the Interaction Institute for Social Change (IISC) is working with Food Solutions New England to design and facilitate the 21 Day Racial Equity Habit Building
3/9/17
This post by Lesley Heiser was originally published by The Rumpus on March 6, 2017 as part of TORCH, their series devoted to showcasing personal essays and interviews about immigrant and refugee experiences. Featuring the work of diverse writers from around the globe, TORCH aims to shatter stereotypes and encourage greater understanding and empathy in a world where immigrant and refugee
3/6/17
This post comes from NAMA's Coordinating Director, Niaz Dorry, and was originally posted on the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance blog . We often are asked "what do you mean by family fishermen" or community-based fishermen, or a Big Box Boat. I have often felt these questions are presented as a distraction to get us to all wound up in a defensive position. As many of you know, we have been
3/2/17
This post was originally published in The Daily Hampshire Gazette, March 1, 2017, by Claire Morenon and Philip Korman and appeared in: CISA Opinion Pieces , Press Room As the national debate about refugees and immigration roils, we at Community Involved in Sustaining Agriculture (CISA) have been reflecting on the history and the modern condition of farm labor in this country, and on our role as
2/17/17
In the spirit of the Summit, which was meant to be driven by and for all Rhode Islanders, we developed this post as a group, with multiple individuals contributing their voices and reflections. Rhode Island’s first Food System Summit, which was held on January 10, 2017, brought together participants from across the state food scene: farmers to composters, fishermen to researchers, state
1/23/17
This post originally appeared on Ferment , the Real Pickles blog. The extraordinary political events taking place in our country are affecting us deeply here at Real Pickles Co-operative , as they are for so many others. They highlight how far we have to go to build the just, democratic, and sustainable society we wish to see. We are reminded why all of us here take Real Pickles’ social mission
1/10/17
The Organization for Refugee and Immigrant Success ( ORIS ) has been operating and developing their New American Sustainable Agricultural Program ( NASAP ) since 2012, primarily running their training program out of their Dunbarton Fresh Start Farms location along with a few other sites. After five years of operations, which resulted in significant soil building and infrastructure, we have

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