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Race, Equity, & Social Justice

This post b y Vanessa Garcia Polanco and Amirio Freeman originally appeared on NESAWG’s blog . Last fall, we attended the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group’s 2017 It Takes a Region Conference, thanks to generous scholarship support provided by NESAWG. Vanessa was selected as conference presenter and also as a youth delegate for NESAWG’s Youth Advocacy Day in Washington, DC, and
The Shah Family Foundation has been working closely with The Boston Public Schools Food and Nutritional Services and the City of Boston on a pilot project in East Boston schools that provides fresh, healthier food to students in BPS. This program creates finishing kitchens at satellite schools who have traditionally relied on frozen, vended meals. Students in these schools are now served fresh
On February 5th, UNH named Curtis Ogden and Karen Spiller as joint recipients of the Thomas W. Haas Professorship in Sustainable Food Systems. The professorship was established in 2013 with a $1 million gift to the Sustainability Institute at UNH from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, generated from a donor-advised fund established by Durham philanthropist Tom Haas. According to the
In the field, I often hear the question from partner organizations or institutions: “Why is evaluation important?” and “Why do we need to do this?”. As an educator and an agriculturalist I cringe at the idea that we would never make room in the cycle to step back and assess our work, reflect upon what has value and what serves purpose, and what needs to drop away to make room for new growth.
The Boston Public Market (BPM) celebrated the grand opening of its newest vendor, FoodCares Urban Market , on November 1 st , 2017. Lead by Baraka Community Wellness Founder and prominent local health advocate, Raheem Baraka , the urban farm aggregate sells fruits, vegetables, and value-added products from a variety of Boston-area growers and small businesses. BPM welcomed Baraka’s latest non-
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change blog by Curtis Ogden on November 20, 2017. “We know that there is no help for us but from one another, that no hand will save us if we do not reach out our hand.” – URSULA K. Le GUIN A note on the quotes below (and the Le Guin quote above): I am grateful for the beautiful piece by Evan Bissel, “Frames for Life,
Race and equity are concerns in all parts of our society, and the food system is no different. From food apartheid to low wages, the food system reflects discrimination in zoning, education, housing, labor protections, and in electoral representation. Identifying what we can do to unravel systemic oppression, and then aligning our institutions to take up the tasks, is a challenge for any
This infographic originally appeared on the ZeroCater blog . Hundreds of years ago, the food most people ate typically came from their backyard, or that of a neighbor, or local farmer. Today, food travels across city and state lines, and often makes a lengthy trek overseas. Local food has become more of a commodity rather than the norm. But with the help of the food justice movement, the food
This post was originally published on the Interaction Institute for Social Change blog by Curtis Ogden on October 2, 2017. “We cannot live for ourselves alone. Our lives are connected by a thousand invisible threads, and along those sympathetic fibers, our actions run as causes and return to us as results.” – Herman Melville Last week I worked with the Backbone Team of Food Solutions New England
UPDATE: Read Migrant Justice's announcement on their agreement with Ben & Jerry’s! Dairy workers kicked off the “Human Rights Can’t Wait” speaking tour through the Northeast September 13, engaging hundreds of students and community members. Presentations included a packed house at Columbia Law School, a community dialogue at the MayDay space in Brooklyn, and a full day at Yale University with