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Race, Equity, & Social Justice

7/30/15
This post originally appeared on the Coalition of Immokalee Workers' blog July 6, 2015. “Success” of “innovative movements” by workers from Vermont to Florida earns spread in U.S.’s most-read newspaper… Just in time for the Fourth of July weekend, the movement for Worker-driven Social Responsibility (WSR) rocketed into the national spotlight thanks to a great new article on the front page of last
7/23/15
This post was originally published by Bill Duesing on June 29, 2015. View the original post here . There has been remarkable positive movement toward growing food for people near where they live, which is often called agroecology. Methods used in this local, healthy and sustainable food system model maximize use of local resources, including sun and waste products and minimize use of fossil fuels
7/20/15
Our food system encompasses the growers, the producers, the distributors, but also those in the service industry. For many of the people who serve us food all day, every day, putting food on their own tables is a challenge. In Rhode Island, food service workers earn a meager $2.89 an hour -- just 30% of Rhode Island’s minimum wage. Forced to rely on the generosity of strangers, much of the food
7/16/15
Producer cooperatives have had a central role in American agriculture for the past 150 years and are continuing to grow in Maine and the Northeast today. In a producer cooperative, individual producers, such as farmers or fishermen, are owners of the cooperative, which provides services such as marketing, aggregation, distribution, and value-added processing. Producer cooperatives can provide
7/13/15
Many who live in Vermont have unique perspectives on food. These voices are the catalyst that can bring a new narrative of prevention, empowerment, and solidarity to the food justice movement. In my work to educate people about the crucial link between local, whole food and the health of communities and land, I learn so much about the experiences of those who keep Vermont’s food system alive. By
7/9/15
I have been a server at Denny’s for 7 years and never once questioned why my managers or customers were able to talk to and treat me the way that they do. I never questioned why I was paid less than minimum wage or how my paychecks came out to be so little at the end of every pay period. I struggle every week to manage my cash tips because that is all I will have to pay my bills, my rent, and
6/18/15
At my house we share “gratefuls” before dinner. This week holding hands around the table set with fresh veggies and grains with grumbling tummies I thanked the farmworker who sweated as they planted the collard greens weeks earlier. I thanked the grocery store worker whose back ached as they stocked the produce section a few days ago. I wondered how many other dozens of food chain workers who I’
6/11/15
The non-negotiable commitment made by Food Solutions New England to racial equity and food justice was a critical and bold declaration for its network. These core values are fundamental guiding principles for restoring and improving healthy ecosystems and a working landscape that supports our quality of life and diverse, thriving communities. Making pathways to a more just and equitable and
6/8/15
Data analysis and visualization is one of the powerful tools we can use to understand and explain trends in food systems. There are many clues to changes underway in food systems, from anecdotes and stories that are relevant in our communities, to news analyses and documentaries that tackle big issues. Vermont’s Farm to Plate Initiative has spent a lot of time collecting and interpreting official
6/5/15
What does it mean to strengthen our local food system? How do we care for each other and our children amid deepening economic and environmental stress? On a Saturday in May, an excited group of curious and committed parishioners and volunteers decided to answer these questions through joint action. On this delightfully warm and sunny afternoon, we gathered on the front steps of Old West Church,

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