Transforming New England's

Food System Together

Food Solutions New England (FSNE) is a regional, collaborative network organized to support the emergence and continued viability of a New England food system that is a resilient driver of healthy food for all, racial equity, sustainable farming and fishing, and thriving communities.

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Latest from the Food Solutions New England Blog

9/13/18
The Food Solutions New England Process Team (our "steering" or advisory team) has voted to endorse the Campaign for Real Meals , recognizing the leverage to be gained in making specific targets more visible in the massive food service industry in North America. Industrial food service represents a $51 billion sector in the US alone, with three firms - Sodexo, Aramark and Compass Group -
9/9/18
Today's post is from our friends at Real Pickles! Come visit them (and Food Solutions New England) at the upcoming Boston Local Food Festival on September 16th! ------------ As you may know, here at Real Pickles we are deeply committed to buying our vegetables only from Northeast family farms and selling our products only within the Northeast . One way in which we are able to achieve this, and in
8/27/18
FSNE Note: We are honored to share this piece from Vanessa Garcia Polanco, an alumna of FSNE's Network Leadership Institute, as she heads out on her next adventure! I am moving to the midwest to pursue graduate school. Ready for the challenge that is to learn a new regional culture, new food systems and English words that will substitute New England colloquialism like bubbler and wicked. As a
8/8/18
FSNE Comment: As we get ready to start organizing the fifth consecutive 21-Day Racial Equity Habit-Building Challenge for April 2019, we are taking a moment to reflect on the learning from this past year. This post, from Curtis Ogden of the Interaction Institute for Social Change , shares how the impacts of the Challenge are rippling ever outward... “We never know how our small activities will
8/6/18
We are blessed in New England with a long tradition of farmers markets throughout the growing season. The number of active markets has increased and the seasons have expanded, with many towns boasting winter markets as well. These direct-to-consumer distribution methods are an important part of the "mix" that creates a vibrant local food economy, keeps money circulating in our local economy and

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