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Food Access

6/4/19
Originally published in the June 3, 2019 issue of VermontBiz . Vermont Business Magazine Vermont still ranks at the top of the Strolling of the Heifers Locavore Index, meaning that it has the strongest producers and consumers of local food of any of the 50 states. But the rest of the Index has been considerably shaken up by new data derived from the recent Census of Agriculture conducted by the U
4/16/19
Guest blog by Renee Brooks Catacalos, author of The Chesapeake Table, Your Guide to Eating Local When I took over Edible Chesapeake magazine in 2006, I made a conscious decision to include my photo with the publisher’s letter each quarter. I wanted to be recognizable, and not just because I’ve always dreamt of being a minor local celebrity. Frankly, I knew that sustainable agriculture was an
9/13/18
The Food Solutions New England Process Team (our "steering" or advisory team) has voted to endorse the Campaign for Real Meals , recognizing the leverage to be gained in making specific targets more visible in the massive food service industry in North America. Industrial food service represents a $51 billion sector in the US alone, with three firms - Sodexo, Aramark and Compass Group -
7/30/18
This week's lead blog post comes from our colleagues at Real Food Challenge , active members of the Food Solutions New England regional network. Real Food Challenge is excited to announce a technical update to our Real Food Standards! In an effort to keep our Standards aligned with changes in the food industry, Real Food Challenge students and alumni leaders have conducted research in
7/25/18
A Community Effort to Dissolve Cape Kids’ Hunger by Eileen Morris and courtesty of Edible Cape Cod A broad warehouse-like structure looms on Queen Anne Road in Harwich, among a range of commercial businesses along the industrial route. The building is the home of the Cape’s largest Family Pantry, which serves over 9300 clients through its home site, mobile pantry, and satellite pantry stationed
6/4/18
In our region, the Connecticut River Valley in Massachusetts, there is a lot of talk right now amongst community food organizations about the whiteness of the majority of people leading those organizations, and what that means in building an equitable, resilient food system. There’s also talk about the Farm Bill reauthorization (which is underway right now) and the impact it could have on
4/10/18
The reason that I as a Black person work to end inequity in the entire food system is simple: Black farmers currently operate less than 1% of the nation’s farms 85% of the people working the land in the US are Latinx migrant workers Only 2.5% of farms are owned and operated by Latinxs and Hispanics People of color are disproportionately likely to live under food apartheid and suffer from diabetes
4/3/18
I am guilty. I am guilty of drinking fair trade and organic coffee out of mason jars. I am guilty of supporting farm-to-table restaurants owned by white folks in communities of color. I am guilty of being one of the few people of color at the farmer's markets while the other patrons stare at my Afro-Latina looks in disbelief that I can afford and want to buy fresh produce. I am guilty of being
3/5/18
The Shah Family Foundation has been working closely with The Boston Public Schools Food and Nutritional Services and the City of Boston on a pilot project in East Boston schools that provides fresh, healthier food to students in BPS. This program creates finishing kitchens at satellite schools who have traditionally relied on frozen, vended meals. Students in these schools are now served fresh
2/2/18
The Monadnock Farm & Community Coalition (MFCC) has announced the launch of a new resource for Coalition partners and community members: a visual and narrative portfolio depicting the array of work people in the Monadnock Region are doing around issues of local food and the ways these individuals experience, relate with, and find meaning in the work. The photographic and written depictions,

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